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Texting Mitts

13 Nov

With the weather getting colder here in southern PA, I’ve recently noticed what a problem it is to do much of anything with your hands when you are wearing gloves or mittens.  Now, I might be an old lady but I can really appreciate the functionality of fingerless gloves.  Not only are they trendy, but they open up a whole new world when it comes to:

1) Texting in cold weather

2) Tuning the car radio

3) Manipulating tiny dog training treats while walking the pup

4) Picking up the aforementioned pup’s deposits

Really, the list is endless!  I rifled through my stash and found several skeins of  worsted weight wool.  Then I searched Ravelry and Crochet Pattern Central for a nice free pattern.  I didn’t want the type with individual fingers left unfinished at the top.  A hole for the thumb and enough fabric to cover the wrist and the hand was what I was after.  Oh, and did I mention that they had to be cute but a little bit sophisticated so that I could wear them anywhere?

Well, the variety of patterns is just endless! Most of what I saw was just beautiful but did not fit the bill for me.  I Googled “fingerless gloves” and after looking at 5 pages of images, I finally saw what I wanted.  It seems that a company called Polyvore was selling a very cute pair of gloves.  I fiddled around with my yarn for a while and think that I managed to come up with a credible facsimile.  My gloves are slightly different but they look just as cute.  I made them in worsted weight and sport weight so you can decide which pair you like best.

You’ll note that I am using buttons made from slices of antler on the grey mitts.  I purchased these in Wyoming a few years ago.  These buttons are made from antlers that have been naturally shed, not from antlers of deer that have been shot.

 

Texting Mitts  Version I

 Size: Medium to Large

Materials: 1 skein worsted weight yarn. (I used Patons Classic Wool)

Size G crochet hook, stitch markers, 4 buttons, 1 large safety-pin

Gauge: In grit stitch-4 st = 1″ and 4 rows = 1″— In puff stitch-3 groups = 3″ and 5 rows = 3″

Stitches Used: slip stitch (sl st), single crochet (sc), chain (ch), double crochet (dc), puff stitch (pst), grit stitch

How to work the grit stitch:   (Sc, dc) into next st. Sk next st. (Sc, dc) into next st.

How to work a beginning puff stitch (bpst): Ch 2, yo hook,insert hook in  st, yo hook, draw through 2 sts, yo hook, insert in same st, yo, draw through all sts.

How to work a puff stitch: yo hook, insert hook into st, yo, draw yarn through 2 loops. Yo hook, insert hook into same st, yo, draw through 2 loops. Yo hook, insert hook into same st, yo, draw through 2 loops, yo, draw through all loops on hook.  You will have a stitch that looks like 3 double crochet stitches joined at the top.  

Puff Stitch Group (pst group): (3 pst,ch2,3 pst) in same space

Right Mitt Cuff

Ch 41. Dc in 3rd ch from hook, sk 1 ch, *(sc , dc) into next ch, sk 1 ch*, work from * to * to last 2 chs. Sk 1 ch, sc into last ch. Ch1, turn.  (39 sts)

Row 2:  Dc in 1st st. Sk next st, *(sc , dc) into next st, sk next st* work from * to * to last 2 sts. Sk next st. Sc in last st. Ch 1, turn.  Mark this row as the right side with a stitch marker.

Repeat row 2 until you have worked a total of 11 rows. Do not fasten off. Place stitch marker into your loop to keep it from unraveling.

Place cuff right side up with one long edge towards you.  Lap left end of cuff under right end, taking up six stitches. Pin in place with a safety pin.  Pick up your loop and sl st into both overlapping pieces, 7th st from the end.  Ch 1, turn. Being sure that you catch both overlapping pieces, sc into next 6 sts. Sc around cuff. Sl st to 1st sc to join. ( 32 sc). Ch 2, turn.

Mitt Section

Round 1) ( Bpst, 2 ch, pst)  in next st. * Sk 3 sts,( 3 pst, 2 ch, 3 past) in next st.* Repeat from * to * around cuff to ch 2. Sl st into 2nd ch of beg ch 2. Turn.

Round 2)  Sl st over to 1st ch 2 sp.  (Bpst, 2 ch, 3 pst) into sp. *3 pst, 2 ch, 3 pst into next ch 2 sp* Repeat from * to * around cuff. Join. Turn. ( 8 groups of psts)

Round 3)  Repeat round 2, working 5 groups of pst, ch 5, sk 1 pstg, work 2 more groups of pst, join, turn.

Round 4)  Work round 2 until you get to the ch 5 from previous row. Work 1 group of pst into the enter ch of the ch 5. Continue in pattern for the remainder of the round.

Round 5) Work round 2.

Edging: Sc t into top of ea pst and into ea ch 2 sp around top of mitt. Join.( 28  sts) Fasten off.  Weave in ends.

Sew 2 buttons into place where cuff overlaps.

Left Mitt Cuff

Work same as for right mitt until you have completed 11 rows of grit stitch. With the right side of the fabric facing up, overlap ends so that the top lap opens on the left side, taking up six stitches.  Pin into place with a safety pin.  Pick up your loop and sl st into the 7th st from the end on the top overlap.  Ch 1, turn. Sc in next st. Sc around cuff until you have worked 26 sts. Now place 6 sc along overlap, making sure to work through both edges. ( 32 sc) Join with a sl st to first sc.

Mitt Section

Rounds 1 and 2) Work same as for right mitt.

Round 3)   Sl st to 1st ch 2 sp.  Work 6 pfs groups, ch 5, sk 1 pstg, work 1 pfs group, join, turn.

Round 4) Continue in pattern working a pfs group into middle ch of ch 5 when you reach it.

Round 5) Work as for right mitt.

Edging and finishing: Complete as for right mitt.

Copyright: Carol Wolf, November 13, 2010

 

Texting Mitts Version II

Size: Small to Medium

Materials: 1 skein sport weight  yarn. (I used Caron’s Simply Soft)

Size G crochet hook, stitch markers, 2 large  buttons, 1 large safety-pin

Stitches Used: slip stitch (sl st), single crochet (sc), chain (ch), double crochet (dc), puff stitch (pst), grit stitch

How to work the grit stitch:   (Sc, dc) into next st. Sk next st. (Sc, dc) into next st.

How to work a beginning puff stitch (bpst): Ch 2, yo hook,insert hook in  st, yo hook, draw through 2 sts, yo hook, insert in same st, yo, draw through all sts.

How to work a puff stitch: yo hook, insert hook into st, yo, draw yarn through 2 loops. Yo hook, insert hook into same st, yo, draw through 2 loops. Yo hook, insert hook into same st, yo, draw through 2 loops, yo, draw through all loops on hook.  You will have a stitch that looks like 3 double crochet stitches joined at the top.  

Puff Stitch Group (pst group): (3 pst,ch 3,3 pst) in same space

Right Mitt Cuff

Note that this version uses 3 chains between puff stitches to complete a puff stitch group (pstg).

Ch 39. Dc into 3rd ch from hook. *Sk next ch, (sc, dc) into next ch*. Repeat from * to * to last ch. Sc into last ch, ch 1, turn. (36 sts)

Row 2:  Dc in 1st st. Sk next st, *(sc , dc) into next st, sk next st* work from * to * to last 2 sts. Sk next st. Sc in last st. Ch 1, turn.  Mark this row as the right side with a stitch marker.

Repeat row 2 until you have worked a total of 11 rows. Do not fasten off. Place stitch marker into your loop to keep it from unraveling.

Joining (dec row): With right side up, overlap cuff ends so that the opening faces the right, taking up 6 sts. Pick up your loop and sl st into the 7th st from the end. Ch, turn. Work 23 sc, work 6 sc into both edges of overlap, join with a sl st to 2nd sc at beg of round. Ch 2, turn.

Mitt Section

Round 1) ( Bpst, 2 ch, pst)  in next st. * Sk 3 sts,( 3 pst, 2 ch, 3 past) in next st.* Repeat from * to * around cuff to ch 2. Sl st into 2nd ch of beg ch 2. Turn.

Round 2)  Sl st over to 1st ch 2 sp.  (Bpst, 2 ch, 3 pst) into sp. *(3 pst, 2 ch, 3 pst)  into next ch 2 sp* Repeat from * to * around cuff. Join. Turn. (7 groups of psts)

Round 3) Work 3 pstg, ch 5, sk 1 pstg, work 3 pstg. Join, turn

Round 4) Repeat round 2.  When you get to the ch 5, work a pstg into the middle ch of the ch 5.

Round 5) Repeat round 2. Do not turn.

Edging: Ch 1. Work 28 sc around mitt. Join. Fasten off.

Left Mitt Cuff

Work as for right mitt cuff.  With right side up, lap cuff in opposite direction from right cuff, taking up 6 stitches. Sl st into 7th st from the end of the bottom lap. Work 23 sc around cuff, work 6 sc into both overlaps, join to 2nd sc at the begging of the round. (28 sts) Ch 2, turn.

Mitt Section

Round 1) ( Bpst, 2 ch, pst)  in next st. * Sk 3 sts,( 3 pst, 2 ch, 3 past) in next st.* Repeat from * to * around cuff to ch 2. Sl st into 2nd ch of beg ch 2. Turn.

Round 2)  Sl st over to 1st ch 2 sp.  (Bpst, 2 ch, 3 pst) into sp. *(3 pst, 2 ch, 3 pst)  into next ch 2 sp* Repeat from * to * around cuff. Join. Turn. (7 groups of psts)

Round 3) Work 5 pstg, ch 5, sk 1 pstg, work 1 pstg. Join, turn.

Round 4) Repeat round 2.  When you get to the ch 5, work a pstg into the middle ch of the ch 5.

Round 5) Repeat round 2. Do not turn.

Edging: Ch 1. Work 28 sc around mitt. Join. Fasten off.

Weave in ends, Sew buttons into place on cuffs.

Copyright Carol Wolf, November 13, 2010

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12 Comments

Posted by on November 13, 2010 in crochet, Projects

 

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12 responses to “Texting Mitts

  1. Dorothy

    November 13, 2010 at 10:32 pm

    Thanks for these patterns Carol. Both are lovely but I can see the pattern better on version 2 (probably because of the colour). I’ll certainly be giving these a go closer to when our winter is due (about 5 months time in Australia).

     
    • Wolf Crochet

      November 14, 2010 at 3:08 pm

      I hope the patterns work out for you Dorothy. I’d love to post a photo of your completed projects on my blog.

       
  2. Julie Witt

    December 3, 2010 at 8:52 am

    I just found your blog and I read the whole thing through, from the very beginning!!! I love your patterns and as somebody who also likes to adapt patterns to include collars, a different length of sleeves, a different border, etc., I like how you explain all of the different changes that you make. I think it makes the item “yours” and individual. Keep up the good work and I will definitely be following your blog from now on. Thanks for all of the free patterns!!

     
    • Wolf Crochet

      December 3, 2010 at 9:02 am

      Oh Julie, you are so nice! Thank you for writing. I hope that you have a very nice holiday. :-)

       
  3. delco expatriate

    April 24, 2011 at 1:31 pm

    Your site is creative, thoughtful, beautifully done, and very generous in its sharing of patterns.

    Just a comment on the antler buttons being from a “naturally shed” rack.

    Death is as natural as shedding, and responsible, conservation minded hunters waste nothing in the creature whose life they take for their sustenance.

    From that radical frugality perspective, buttons you would make from antlers of a locally harvested animal are far more respectful to the animal than antlers brought in via jet travel that punches a hole in the ozone layer, requires massive amounts of eco-destruction to sustain the building and operation of planes, and wars for fossil energy. (Do you have any idea what the Middle East oil wars are doing to the antlered/horned creatures there?)

    If you want to see some horrific animal abuse, go to the fossil energy refineries of SE PA and look at what (constant, incremental) oil spills do to animals. It is far worse than a well placed arrow or bullet, launched in prayer and respect, and hitting its mark deftly and with compassion. Each mile we drive or fly contributes to that.

    And don’t even get me started on what factory farm agriculture does to the souls and spirits of animals!

    I personally do not hunt, since I don’t seem to need meat for my sustenance. But the hunters I know are immensely respectful of the creatures they kill for food and skins/sinew/etc. Most I’ve known would be very pleased to know that antler material went to the use of crafting warmth and frugal use of leftovers!

    Again, thanks for the lovely and craftilicious blog. It’s one of the best on the Web.

     
    • Wolf Crochet

      April 25, 2011 at 5:42 am

      Delco, thank you for your beautifully written and thoughtful comments. I really appreciate your perspective on our relationship to our natural world. Raising the consiousness of our entire human population is a daunting task and I fear that it will not be accomplished in my lifetime.

       
  4. Judy Harvey

    August 3, 2011 at 6:55 pm

    Hi,
    I am looking for a pattern of fingerless gloves that convert to mittens. Is this what your patterns do?
    Judy

     
    • Wolf Crochet

      August 4, 2011 at 5:43 am

      No Judy, sorry!

       
  5. azbabs

    January 7, 2013 at 10:55 pm

    Is the bottom not joined? Should the bottoms be stitched? I feel like I’m missing something

     
    • Wolf Crochet

      January 8, 2013 at 5:57 am

      Azbabs, the bottoms are not joined. If you read further down in the pattern, you will see that they are joined after the cuff is complete. Then you will overlap the ends and join them with buttons at the end.

       

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